12v power supply with battery backup circuit

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12v power supply with battery backup circuit

Alarm clocks are a good example of this. The simplest solution to this problem is a battery backup system. There are many different kinds of battery backup systems, and the type that you use is largely dependent on what you are powering. For this project, I designed a simple circuit that you can use to power low power electronics that run at 12 volts or less.

First, you need a DC power supply. These are very common and come in a variety of voltages and current ratings. The power supply connects to the circuit with a DC power connector. This is then connected to a blocking diode. The blocking diode prevents electricity from the battery backup system from feeding back into the power supply. Next, a rechargeable battery is connected using a resistor and another diode. The resistor allows the battery to be slowly charged from the power supply, and the diode provides a low resistance path between the battery and the circuit so that it can power the circuit if the voltage of the power supply ever drops too low.

If the circuit that you are driving requires a regulated power supply then you can simply add a voltage regulator onto the end. If you are powering an Arduino or similar microcontroller, you should keep in mind that the Vin pin and the DC power connector are already connected to an internal voltage regulator.

So you can connect any voltage between 7V and 12V directly to the Vin pin. To figure out which value resistor you should use, you first need to consider your power supply. When you are working with a non-regulated power supply, the output voltage is not fixed. To check this, take a multimeter and measure the voltage at the output terminals of the power supply while no other circuit is connected.

This will be the maximum voltage of the power supply. Once the battery is fully charged, however, continuing to apply this amount of current could quickly damage it. If a battery is to be continuously charged over an indefinite time period such as in a battery backup systemthen the charge rate needs to be very low.

12v power supply with battery backup circuit

To be safe, I want the charge current to be 8mA or less. Given this, you can calculate what the value of the resistor needs to be.

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To calculate the necessary value of your resistor, start with the open circuit voltage of the power supply, then subtract the voltage of the fully charged battery pack. This gives you the voltage across the resistor.

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To find the resistance, divide the voltage difference by maximum current. In my case, the power supply had an open circuit voltage of 9V and the voltage of the battery pack was about 6V. This gave a voltage difference of 3V. Dividing these 3 volts by the current of 0. So your resistor should be at least ohms. I used a 1 kohm resistor to be extra safe.Have you ever tried to design a battery charger which charges the battery automatically when battery voltage is below the specified voltage?

This article explains you how to design an automatic battery charger. Below charger automatically shut off the charging process when battery attains full charge. This prevents the deep charge of the battery. If the battery voltage is below the 12V, then circuit automatically charges the battery. Circuit Diagram of Automatic Battery Charger. The main supply voltage V, 50Hz is connected to the primary winding of the center tapped transformer to step down the voltage to V.

The output of the transformer is connected to the Diodes D1, D2. This process is also called as rectification. Thus the output of the capacitor unregulated Dc voltage. The output voltage of this voltage regulator is variable from 1. The output voltage of this voltage regulator is varied by varying the pot 10k which is connected to the adjust pin of LM Lm voltage regulator output is applied to the battery through the diode D5 and resistor R5.

Here diode D5 is used to avoid the discharge of battery when main supply fails. When battery charges fully, the zener diode D6 which connected in reverse bias conducts. Now base of BD NPN transistor gets the current through the zener so that the total current is grounded.

In this circuit green LED is used for indicating the charge of the battery. Resistor R3 is used to protect the green LED from high voltages. At this time zener diode D6 will not conduct because battery takes all the current for charging.

When the battery voltage rises to Now the base of the transistor gets the sufficient current to turn on so that the output current from LM voltage regulator is grounded through the transistor Q1. As a result Red LED indicates the full of charge.

DIY - 12V Mini UPS

The output voltage of the battery charger should be less than 1.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service. Electrical Engineering Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for electronics and electrical engineering professionals, students, and enthusiasts. It only takes a minute to sign up. I'm trying to design a power backup system for my saltwater aquarium. In short, the system will be powered by a 12VDC power supply while the mains power is on.

On power failure, the system will automatically switch to a battery source until the mains comes back on. At this point, it will switch back to the 12VDC power supply. I believe I have all that worked out, no issues. The only thing I'm stuck on is the 12VDC power supply that runs the system under normal conditions.

If this power supply fails, the system will detect this as a power failure and switch to the battery bank. The batteries will eventually run out because they're meant for short term life support, not for indefinite running. At this point, it seems like the greatest weakness in the system is the 12VDC power supply that runs the system during normal operation. So, my question: would it be safe to wire two identical 12VDC power supplies in parallel for redundancy purposes only?

Note, I am NOT trying to gain additional capacity from this configuration, only redundancy. One power supply could very easily handle the entire load. The power supplies in question will be 12V 40A, and the consumption of the system tops out around W. You should re-think your topology if reliability is really so important. Your most likely point of failure is the switchover relay, not the 12 V power supply. I would set up the system to always run from the 12 V battery, just that the power supply charges the battery when line power is available.

This is exactly how the 12 V system in your car works. It is always connected to the battery, but the battery is charged when the alternator is running. Lead-acid batteries can be held at their "float charge" voltage indefinitely without damage. The alternator and regulator system in a car is usually set to Since you'll generally be charging for long periods of time, you can be a little more conservative, like To achieve this, get a "12 V" power supply that can be tweaked a little.

Many can. Put a Schottky diode between the power supply output and the 12 V lead-acid battery, then adjust the power supply for the desired float charge voltage at the battery. The actual power supply voltage will be a little higher due to the diode. You can even add redundant power supplies, each with their own diode if you like. You have to make sure that your 12 V equipment can handle the full range of voltage from the battery almost depleted to the battery full and being float-charged.

This system can even support multiple power supplies and multiple batteries. Here is what it would look like:. This scheme allows for as many power supplies and batteries as you want.The idea was requested by Mr. I need a circuit like, I have two 12v dc adapter mA and 2A.

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When input Mains is present, with the ma adapter i want to charge the battery 7. MY modem is rated as 12V 2. That is why i want to use two 12v dc adapter. Two adapters actually are not required for the proposed application. A single adapter, probably the one which is being used for charging the laptop battery may be used for charging the external battery also. Looking at the given DC modem UPS circuit diagram we can see a simple yet interesting configuration involving a couple of diodes D1, D2, and resistor R1.

Normally a laptop charger is specified with 18V, so for charging a 12V battery this needs to be lowered to 14V. This is easily done using a transistor zener stage. When mains is present, the voltage at D1 cathode is more positive than D2, which keeps D2 reverse biassed. This allows only D1 to conduct, supplying the voltage from the adapter to the modem. D2 being switched OFF, the connected battery starts receiving the required charging voltage via R1 and begins getting charged in the process.

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In an event AC mains fails, D1 gets switched OFF, and therefore allows D2 to conduct, enabling the battery voltage to instantly reach the modem without causing any interruptions to the network. The second circuit explains a simple boost converter UPS circuit for supplying an uninterruptible power to satellite TV set top boxes so that the offline recording is never allowed to fail during power outages.

Aniruddha Mukherji. I am an enthusiast electronic hobbyist person. Though I know only the basics, I am sure you must be getting 's of emails daily and I am completely betting on my luck if this one gets to your "eyes". I had thought of a small back up system,I had purchased a small 6 volt 11 watt CFL Ballast circuit thinking as cheap alternate solution, but the same failed to work. I do not want to tamper with their system and get penalized for whatsoever failures which may come to it due to natural course of operation.Data loss is a concern in telecom, industrial and automotive applications where embedded systems depend on a consistent supply of power.

Sudden power interruptions can corrupt data during read and write operations for hard drives and flash memory. Often, embedded systems need just 10ms to 50ms to backup volatile data to prevent loss. Data backup is used in embedded systems for maintenance, troubleshooting and repair work.

12v power supply with battery backup circuit

These applications require a stable power supply and data retention, but unreliable power sources make it difficult to accomplish. Long supply lines, discharged batteries, unregulated AC adapters, load dumps and switching high power electrical motors result in widely fallible input supplies.

As a result, developers of embedded systems prefer to design with the widest possible input voltage range, enabling use in a variety of applications and environments. Figure 1 shows a system that delivers reliable primary power plus holdup power for data backup. This solution is centered on the LTC bidirectional power backup supply. When the input voltage is interrupted, the LTC discharges the storage capacitor into the load in buck mode, keeping the nominal voltage at the load V SYS in the range of 3V to 17V.

Electrolytic capacitors are inexpensive and widely available, significantly reducing the cost of the backup solution. Another advantage of the LTC is its ability to support 12V systems, the default standard voltage rail in many automotive and industrial applications. The buck-boost regulator maintains a steady 12V output so long as the input voltage stays within the specified range, allowing V SYS to ride through brownout and overvoltage conditions such as automotive cold crank and load dump.

When the input voltage is interrupted or moves out of this range, the LTC based backup power solution maintains the V SYS system voltage to allow for short term data backup. When Q1 is in the off state, the body diode of this transistor effectively isolates the load from the input lines. The PFO flag identifies the fault and signals the host computer to disconnect the noncritical loads and supply circuitry. Here it is assumed that the critical circuitry related to data retention consumes 1A for up to ms.

Figure 2 illustrates the entire switch-over process. At the start, the system load is supplied by the LTM, as the input voltage is present.

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When the input voltage is interrupted, the LTC supports the system load by discharging the storage capacitor. Figure 3 shows the timing of the switch-over in more detail. The formulas for an estimation of the required storage capacitance and holdup time are below.

The LTC is a highly integrated, high performance backup regulator.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service.

Electrical Engineering Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for electronics and electrical engineering professionals, students, and enthusiasts. It only takes a minute to sign up. I have also updated my questions to make it more clear what I am asking. I'm leaving the top paragraphs for completeness' sake. I am trying to design a circuit using an Arduino U2 that will detect the incoming voltage from my car V1 in addition to detecting the voltage on a backup battery V2 in the circuit.

I wrote all of the Arduino code for this before even realizing that the schematic design for this circuit was beyond my beginner's knowledge. I've taken a crack at producing the schematic of my system, below. The Arduino code triggers a relay that energizes my load a raspberry pi computer with some other accessories when the car is providing voltage my cigarette lighter is keyed with the accessory switch and when the system loses power, it will run from battery for 30 minutes before gracefully shutting down the raspberry pi.

It's just about done except for the circuit in this post. While the system is operating, I am hoping that the input current from the car electrical system will top-off the battery it is a 12V SLA deep-cycle. When I run the simulator on this circuit, the voltage out at VBat is not 12 or I'm also curious about how I can prevent the voltage from the backup battery in this circuit from seeping back into the car electric system I'm assuming I need a diode, however I was unable to make a diode behave as I would expect in the below circuit.

What is the proper way to hook up a backup battery in this scenario so that the battery not only is appropriately isolated from sending back-voltage to the car, but also receives charging voltage from the car? After Andy Aka's circuit revision, I have a now properly-operating circuit according to circuitlab.

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The only problem I need to solve for is how to properly charge the 12V battery from the Andy aka's answer below makes reference to a Schottky diode but I'm not sure how I would wire that up to provide charging voltage to the battery. This is more of a comment than an answer because your requirements are made fuzzy by your illogical don't take it to heart circuit:. If so, then add the relay contact either in series with the 12V battery or in series with Vout. I'm assuming that your arduino will always take power from one of the supplies.

I guess you'll need some kind of charge circuit for the 12V to keep it topped up too.

12v power supply with battery backup circuit

This can be done with a schottky diode in series with a resistor from Sign up to join this community. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top. Home Questions Tags Users Unanswered.

3 Simple DC UPS Circuits for Modem/Router

Asked 6 years, 7 months ago. Active 6 years, 7 months ago. Viewed 3k times. I'm also curious about how I can prevent the voltage from the backup battery in this circuit from seeping back into the car electric system I'm assuming I need a diode, however I was unable to make a diode behave as I would expect in the below circuit What is the proper way to hook up a backup battery in this scenario so that the battery not only is appropriately isolated from sending back-voltage to the car, but also receives charging voltage from the car?

Peter Grace Peter Grace 2 2 silver badges 7 7 bronze badges.The Power-Pac offers peace of mind for the system designer or base station operator This unique power supply assures that a base station can remain up and running to power communications when it is often needed most - during a power outage. These are kept at peak charge during the normal functioning of the unit when AC is being supplied.

In the event of a loss of AC power, the internal batteries automatically take over to power communication equipment, providing a true uninterruptible DC source. Download Manual PDF. Request a Quote or Additional Information. Batteries are automatically recharged when AC is restored.

The operator is kept informed of all important functions such as AC input, DC output and battery status with front panel indicator lights and a low battery warning buzzer.

Output: Model Battery Capacity Weight lbs. Batteries are automatically recharged when AC is restored The operator is kept informed of all important functions such as AC input, DC output and battery status with front panel indicator lights and a low battery warning buzzer.


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